Troy Ancient City

The ancient city of Troy is a historical place that became very popular after the blockbuster movie Brad Pitt played in it. The story of a big city dragged into a decade-long war over the kidnapping of Helen, the most beautiful woman in the world, is irresistibly dramatic and tragic. Troy is within the borders of Canakkale province of Turkey today. Canakkale city center is half an hour away by car.

Ancient City of Troy Architecture

Troy II (2600-1950 BC) doubled as the previous one and featured a smaller town and upper castle. The walls protected the upper acropolis, which housed the megaron-style palace for the king. It is seen that it was destroyed by a great fire in the archaeological excavations in the second phase, but the Trojans, II. They rebuilt it to form a fortified fortress, larger than Troy but containing smaller and denser houses. It is thought that the reason for this dense and fortified structuring is an economic recession and an increase in external threats. The construction of the city walls, which covered a larger area, continued in Troy III, IV and V.

Troy VI can be characterized by the construction of the columns at the south gate. The columns are not thought to support any structure, but have an altar-like base and impressive size. This structure is probably thought to be the place where the city performed its religious rituals. Another characteristic feature of Troy VI; It is a tightly packed enclosure near the castle and the construction of many cobblestone streets. Although there are only a few houses, this is because of its reconstruction on the hills of Troy VIIa.

Troy Ancient City

Also discovered in 1890, this VI. Mycenaean pottery was found in the Trojan layer. This pottery shows that during Troy IV the Trojans still traded with the Greeks and the Aegean. In addition, cremation tombs were found 400 meters south of the castle. This provided evidence of a small lower city south of the Hellenistic city walls. Although the size of this city is unknown due to erosion and regular construction activities, when it was discovered by Blegen during the excavation of the site in 1953, a ditch was found that could be used to defend the settlements just above the bedrock. Moreover, it is probable that the small settlement south of the wall itself was used as a barrier to protect the main city walls and the castle.

Whether Troy belongs to the Anatolian or Mycenaean civilization is still a matter of debate. Although the city has a presence in the Aegean, the ceramic finds and architecture strongly hint at its Anatolian orientation, in addition, many of the Luwian city-states dominated the region and Aegean trade during the early Trojan periods (Troy I-VII). Like the Luwian cities along the Aegean coast, Troy is likely to be a Luwian city in the light of the ruins found in the excavations. Only one percent of the pottery found during the Troy VI excavation belongs to the Mycenaean civilization. The city’s great walls and gates are closely related to many other Anatolian designs. Also, the practice of cremation is a feature of Anatolian culture. Cremation is never seen in the Mycenaean world. Anatolian hieroglyphs were also unearthed in 1995, along with the bronze seals marked with the Anatolian hieroglyph Luwian script. These seals were occasionally seen in about 20 other Anatolian and Syrian cities (1280 – 1175 BC).

Ancient City of Troy Architecture

Troy VI continued its long-distance commercial dominance during this period, and its population saw the zenith of its establishment, housed between 5,000 and 10,000 people, and rose to the status of an important city. Troy’s location was extremely convenient in the Early Bronze Age. During the Middle and Late Bronze Ages, Afghanistan was the common point for a long-distance trading region reaching as far as the Persian Gulf, the Baltic Region, Egypt, and the western Mediterranean. Commercial products thought to have passed through Troy VI in the middle and early period can be seen from the remains of hundreds of shipwrecks found along the Turkish coast of various products such as metals from the east and perfumes and oils from the west. There was an abundance of trade goods on these ships, and some of the ships are observed to be carrying more than 15 tons of goods.

How Troy Ancient City Was Destroyed

Troy VI was destroyed by a possible earthquake around 1250 BC. Except for an arrowhead, no body remains were found in this layer, but the city quickly healed and was rebuilt more regularly. With this reconstruction, the city center continued its trend of having a heavily fortified castle to protect the outer edge of the city against earthquakes and sieges.

Troy Walls, How Troy Ancient City Was Destroyed

Historical Artifacts Found in Troy

Goods discovered in the shipwrecks include copper, tin, glass ingots, bronze tools, weapons, ebony, ivory, ostrich egg shells, jewellery, and pottery from different cultures from all over the Mediterranean. From the Bronze Age, 63 of the 210 shipwrecks discovered in the Mediterranean have been discovered along Turkey’s coastline, but remains at the site of Troy are minimal. It is seen that very few of his goods found in Troy VI layer have been documented. The likely result is that there were few commercial centers and low trade volume during the Late Bronze Age. Troy is in the north of the biggest commercial routes, so it would be more accurate to define Troy as ‘a metropolis that contributes significantly to trade’ rather than directly as a commercial center.

Pots
Historical Artifacts Found in Troy

B.C. Dating to the middle of the 13th century, Troy VII is the strongest candidate for Homeric Troy, as it was revealed during excavations that this universe was destroyed by war. End of Troy VII and estimated BC. Evidence of the fires and massacres that took place in 1184 caused this universe to be identified with the city besieged by the Achaeans during the Trojan War, and the Trojan War was immortalized in the Iliad Epic written by Homer.

Pots
Historical Artifacts Found in Troy

The period of Troy VIII (700 BC) is known as Hellenistic Troy. Hellenistic Troy is culturally similar to the rest of the Aegean. The events experienced in this period were transferred to the present day by Greek and Roman historians after the period.

The city, after an eleven-day siege BC. In 85 BC it was destroyed by Sulla’s rival, the Roman general Fimbria. Later that year, when Sulla defeated Fimbria, he helped rebuild the city to reward his loyalty.

Relief
Historical Artifacts Found in Troy

Trojan Horse

Large hollow wooden horse built by the Greeks during the Trojan War to enter Troy. The horse was made by Epeius, a master carpenter and boxer. The Trojan horse continues to be used in our daily lives today. Programs that are installed on computers like a good program but actually allow a foreign person to take control of the computer are called trojan horses. Just like it was 3000 years ago.

Troy Trojan Horse Model